Women in Management Worldwide: Facts, Figures and Analysis

Women in Management Worldwide: Facts, Figures and Analysis by Marilyn J. Davidson, Ronald J. Burke

Title: Women in Management Worldwide: Facts, Figures and Analysis
Author: Marilyn J. Davidson, Ronald J. Burke
ISBN10: 0754608379
ISBN13: 978-0754608370
Publisher: Ashgate Pub Ltd (March 1, 2004)
Language: English
Subcategory: Politics & Government
Size PDF: 1410 kb
Size Fb2: 1399 kb
Rating: 3.5/5
Votes: 394
Pages: 352 pages
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Women in Management Worldwide: Facts, Figures and Analysis by Marilyn J. Davidson, Ronald J. Burke


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There has been a dramatic increase in the number of women who have entered the workplace in both developed and developing countries. One contributing factor is the increasing education women have pursued, coupled with increasing numbers of women undertaking professional studies (business, law, engineering). This has resulted in greater numbers of women pursuing professional and managerial careers. We have witnessed a revolution in women's roles in society, particularly in the workplace, during this time. However, this revolution has not resulted in increases in women's participation at the top levels of corporations. Few women are CEOs of large organizations and few women occupy seats on the boards of directors of private sector organizations. The existence of a "glass ceiling" artificially limiting women's advancement appears to be a worldwide phenomenon. Increasing amounts of research and writing have focused on the glass ceiling, why it exists, why it has been so difficult to eliminate it and what companies and governments are undertaking to support women's advancement. Although these concerns are worldwide, the bulk of the research and writing has been undertaken in the USA, with limited contributions also coming from the UK and Canada. These issues exist to varying degrees and in varying forms in all developed and developing countries but have received relatively little consideration outside these countries, or whatever local attention they have received has not been accessible to much of the world. This book aims to bridge that gap and presents material on the position of women in management in a wide range of developed and developing countries throughout the world. This is problematic since sharing research findings and successful initiatives across countries is likely to facilitate women's development and progress. It is helpful to know that other countries are struggling with common issues of fairness, respect, utilizing the talents of all their citizens. There is likely to be synergy when like-minded people from different countries come together to explore mutual interests. It is obviously important to understand each countries' history, culture and economic circumstances to provide a context for their current status of women in the workforce.