Jazz in New Orleans: The Postwar Years Through 1970 (Studies in Jazz)

Jazz in New Orleans: The Postwar Years Through 1970 (Studies in Jazz) by Charles Suhor

Title: Jazz in New Orleans: The Postwar Years Through 1970 (Studies in Jazz)
Author: Charles Suhor
ISBN10: 0810839075
ISBN13: 978-0810839076
Publisher: Scarecrow Press; Reprint edition (April 11, 2001)
Language: English
Subcategory: Music
Size PDF: 1891 kb
Size Fb2: 1549 kb
Rating: 3.5/5
Votes: 243
Pages: 384 pages
Other Format: azw lrf lit rtf

Jazz in New Orleans: The Postwar Years Through 1970 (Studies in Jazz) by Charles Suhor


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Jazz in New Orleans provides accurate information about, and an insightful interpretation of, jazz in New Orleans from the end of World War II through 1970. Suhor, relying on his experiences as a listener, a working jazz drummer, and writer in New Orleans during this period, has done a great service to lovers of New Orleans music by filling in some gaping holes in postwar jazz history and cutting through many of the myths and misconceptions that have taken hold over the years. Skillfully combining his personal experiences and historical research, the author writes with both authority and immediacy. The text, rich in previously unpublished anecdotes and New Orleans lore, is divided into three sections, each with an overview essay followed by pertinent articles Suhor wrote for national and local journals―including Down Beat and New Orleans Magazine. Section One, "Jazz and the Establishment," focuses on cultural and institutional settings in which jazz was first battered, then nurtured. It deals with the reluctance of power brokers and the custodians of culture in New Orleans to accept jazz as art until the music proved itself elsewhere and was easily recognizable as a marketable commodity. Section Two, "Traditional and Dixieland Jazz," highlights the music and the musicians who were central to early jazz styles in New Orleans between 1947 and 1953. Section Three, "An Invisible Generation," will help dispel the stubborn myth that almost no one was playing be-bop or other modern jazz styles in New Orleans before the current generation of young artists appeared in the 1980s.